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Scaevola albida

This particular form is native to the Mount Annan site and grows well on our clay soil.

It adapts well to cultivation in a range of well-drained soils, does best in sunny or semi-shaded sites and is frost hardy. A good choice for rockeries, containers and path-side plantings as it softly cascades and sprawls.

There are a number of forms and cultivars available at good nurseries.

Common namepale fan-flower
Scientific nameScaevola albida (Sm.) Druce
FamilyGoodeniaceae
Etymology

Genus: Latin, scaevola, little hand. Referring to the dried flowers supposedly resembling a withered hand.

Species: From Latin, albidus, somewhat white, referring to the pale flowers.

DistributionOccurs from south-eastern Queensland through eastern New South Wales and coastal areas of Victoria and Tasmania in a range of habitats.
Native habitatGrows in sclerophyll forest and low-growing coastal communities, chiefly on the coast and ranges.
DescriptionA prostrate, root suckering herb with white, mauve, pale blue or pink flowers.
Flowering/fruitingThroughout the year.
Location in gardenYou can see it planted in Bed 29 in the Connections Garden and in the Woodland Picnic Area.
Garden ExplorerView Scaevola albida on Garden Explorer
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